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Home Inspections

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation.

What does a home inspection include?

  • Roof
  • Foundation, basement, structural
  • Heating system
  • Central air conditioning system
  • Water heater
  • Exterior
  • Plumbing and electrical systems
  • Living spaces, doors, windows
  • Attic & insulation
  • Garage



  • Schedule by phone or online
  • One call does it all. We handle all the access, setup, and notifications for you
  • Email and text reminders


  • We inspect YOUR new home like we’re buying it ourselves.
  • ASHI-certified inspectors
  • Latest tools and technologies


  • Personalized walkthrough so you can see things with your own eyes.
  • Identification of $1,000+ problems
  • Graphical summary sheet


  • Easy to read
  • 75+ color photos
  • Emailed within 24 hours
  • Knowledge is power!


  • Peace of mind
  • Avoid the Money Pit!
  • Savings - Call2Inspect clients commonly receive $2,000 to $4,000 in seller concessions


What is The ASHI Experience?

Only an ASHI inspector can provide you with a professional, personalized inspection that combines more than 40 years of the highest technical standards, adherence to a strict code of ethics and the very best in customer service and education. We call this “The ASHI Experience”.

When you choose ASHI, you’ll be working with professional home inspectors who have passed the most rigorous technical examinations in effect today, including inspectors who are required to perform more than 250 professional inspections before they’re even allowed to call themselves ”certified”. Mandatory continuing education helps the membership stay current with the latest in technology, materials and professional skills. No other professional society can match the credentials of an ASHI inspector.

The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) publishes a Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics that outlines what you should expect to be covered in your home inspection report.

Why do I need a home inspection?

Buying a home could be the largest single investment you will ever make. To minimize unpleasant surprises and unexpected difficulties, you’ll want to learn as much as you can about the newly constructed or existing house before you buy it. A home inspection may identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights, as well as the need for maintenance to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will know more about the house, which will allow you to make decisions with confidence.

If you already are a homeowner, a home inspection can identify problems in the making and suggest preventive measures that might help you avoid costly future repairs.

If you are planning to sell your home, a home inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

What will it cost?

The inspection fee for a typical one-family house varies geographically, as does the cost of housing. Similarly, within a given area, the inspection fee may vary depending on a number of factors such as the size of the house, its age and possible optional services such as septic, well or radon testing.

Do not let cost be a factor in deciding whether or not to have a home inspection or in the selection of your home inspector. The sense of security and knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost, and the lowest-priced inspection is not necessarily a bargain. Use the inspector’s qualifications, including experience, training, compliance with your state’s regulations, if any, and professional affiliations as a guide.

Why can’t I do it myself?

Even the most experienced homeowner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector. An inspector is familiar with the elements of home construction, proper installation, maintenance and home safety. He or she knows how the home’s systems and components are intended to function together, as well as why they fail.

Above all, most buyers find it difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may have an effect on their judgment. For accurate information, it is best to obtain an impartial, third-party opinion by a professional in the field of home inspection.

Can a house fail a home inspection?

No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value. It is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.

The issues that really matter will fall into four categories:

1. Major defects, such as a structural failure;
2. Conditions that can lead to major defects, such as a roof leak;
3. Issues that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home if not rectified immediately; and
4. Safety hazards, such as an exposed, live buss bar at the electrical panel.
Anything in these categories should be addressed as soon as possible. Often, a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property.

When do I call a home inspector?

Typically, a home inspector is contacted immediately after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed. Before you sign, be sure there is an inspection clause in the sales contract, making your final purchase obligation contingent on the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms and conditions to which both the buyer and seller are obligated.

Do I have to be there?

While it’s not required that you be present for the inspection, it is highly recommended. You will be able to observe the inspector and ask questions as you learn about the condition of the home and how to maintain it.

What if the report reveals problems?

No house is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn’t mean you should or shouldn’t buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. If your budget is tight, or if you don’t want to become involved in future repair work, this information will be important to you. If major problems are found, a seller may agree to make repairs.

If the house proves to be in good condition, did I really need an inspection?

Definitely. Now you can complete your home purchase with confidence. You’ll have learned many things about your new home from the inspector’s written report, and will have that information for future reference.


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Yelp rated
#1 Rated Denver Home Inspector
Call for a quote 303-730-7233 M-F 7AM-6PM | SAT 8AM - 1PM